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Industry News: ESG5

      Know Your Breach: Transcredit

      The Target: Transcredit, a Florida based credit reporting company.

      The Take: Exposure of 822, 789 records of Personally Identifiable Information including: first and last names, emails, bank information, notes of payment history, internal User ID’s and passwords, full data schema detailing where and how data stored.

      The Vector: An unsecured, non-password protected database was found open and accessible by anyone with an internet connection.

      It is critical to employ robust practices of credential management, user authentication and validation around all points of access. An unprotected point of entry on a key piece of equipment like a server can lead to a breach with a cascading effect on data security. Furthermore, the access credentials which were exposed could lead to pivot attacks by breaching other IT systems belonging to the firm.

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      Know Your Breach: FCI

      The Target: Fertility Center of Illinois

      The Take: Exposure of Personally Identifiable Information including: full names, social security numbers, financial information, medical data, and health insurance policy numbers, employee numbers, and passport numbers.

      The Vector: The threat actors were able to access a third-party server where FCI’s data was stored, and as the firm did not employ proper authentication tools, the attackers were able to freely view and download the sensitive information. 

      This breach highlights the critical nature of employing robust practices of credential management, user authentication and validation around all points of access. An unprotected point of entry on a key piece of equipment like a server can lead to a breach with a cascading effect on data security. Furthermore, firms must be aware of where their data is stored, be that on their own sites or a third-party, and take steps to ensure it is secure.

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      Know Your Breach: US Cellular

      The Target: United States Cellular Corporation, a wireless carrier. 

      The Take: Personally Identifiable information including: names, addresses, PIN codes, phone numbers, information on wireless usage and billing statements.

      The Vector: The threat actors contacted employees of U.S Cellular and tricked them into downloading and installing malicious software and as the employees were logged on with legitimate credentials, the dangerous software was able to be installed. This malware let the attackers further access customer accounts remotely to port the victim’s phone numbers to a different carrier.

      This breach highlights the ongoing and ever-present threat that social engineering poses to firms. Regular training and policy review can help firms ensure their employees are employing a slow and measured approach whenever access, or installation of software, is made – especially when the request is initiated from outside the firm.

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      Know Your Breach: Cox Communications

      The Target: Cox Communications, a U.S based digital cable provider and telecommunicating company.

      The Take: Breach of employee accounts, leading to further exposure of Personally Identifiable Information including: name, address, telephone, Cox account number, username, PIN code, account security question and answer. 

      The Vector: The threat actor impersonated a Cox Support Agent and gained access to a different employee’s credentials, which allowed them to view the sensitive data. 

      This breach highlights the ongoing and persistent threat of social engineering. Regular awareness testing and training, along with tone-from-the-top messaging to emphasize the importance of critical thinking and caution are crucial to protecting sensitive information assets.

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      Know Your Breach: Sennheiser

      The Target: Sennheiser, an audio equipment manufacturer.

      The Take: Exposure of Personally Identifiable Information of 28,000 customers including: full names, email address, phone numbers, names of client companies and their employees.

      The Vector: An unsecured public facing Amazon S3 storage server was left open on the internet, meaning anyone who navigated to the address would able to view the information in full.

      It is critical to employ robust practices of credential management, user authentication and validation around all points of access. An unprotected point of entry on a key piece of equipment like a server can lead to a breach with a cascading effect on data security.

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      Know Your Breach: Gumtree

      The Target: Gumtree, a U.K based online retailer of used goods.

      The Take: Exposure of potentially 1.7 million records of Personally Identifiable Information including: full name and physical location (postal code or coordinates).

      The Vector: A software vulnerability allowed threat actors to view user’s physical locations by simply pressing F12 to view the Developer Tools and inspect the website’s source code, a feature present in every modern internet browser. In addition, one of its APIs exposed usernames, allowing them to be read without any authentication. 

      This breach highlights the importance of rigorous software testing and the deployment of authentication methods wherever user data is being handled. Ensuring that whenever a firm’s website is transmitting user data it is using protective and confidential methods, such as securing source code and employing proper authentication, will help firms meet cyber industry standards which are critical for a company’s overall posture.

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      Know Your Breach: RATP

      The Target: Régie Autonome des Transports Parisiens

      The Take: Exposure of 3 million records of Personally Identifiable Information belonging to 60,000 employees including: full names, email addresses, source code and APIs, logins for their RATP accounts, hashed passwords, and more critically, access to the firm’s Github account where attackers could access ongoing projects.

      The Vector: The data was left open and accessible to public on an unsecured SQL database backup server, allowing anyone with internet access to connect and view the sensitive information.

      It is critical to employ robust practices of credential management, user authentication and validation around all points of access. An unprotected point of entry on a key piece of equipment like a server can lead to a breach with a cascading effect on data exposure. This breach highlights the multiplicative effects of these cascading pivot attacks which is why it’s important to lock down every point of access in an IT system.

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      Know Your Breach: Huntington Hospital

      The Target: Huntington Hospital, a New York based medical center.

      The Take: Exposure of 13,000 records of Personally Identifiable Information including: name, date-of-birth, phone number, addresses, internal account number, medical record number, diagnoses, and other treatment information.

      The Vector: An employee improperly accessed this information without clearance and was not prevented from viewing this data based upon their level of access and role within the firm, exposing the data.

      This breach highlights the important concept of Least-Privilege when it comes to system access and authorization. Employees should only have access to the minimum amount of information and privileges they need to do their role. Ensuring this process is applied at all levels of access across a firm is a key component to maintaining a robust Cybersecurity posture.

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      Know Your Breach: GoDaddy

      The target: GoDaddy, a U.S based website domain registrar and web hosting company.

      The take: 1.2 million records of customer information including: email addresses, SSH keys, and database usernames and passwords.

      The attack vector: The threat actor gained access to GoDaddy’s hosting servers through a compromised employee account, granting them the same access to all the systems the firm’s user had. Multi-factor authentication was not enabled.

      This breach highlights not only the ever-present threat that compromised employee accounts pose to firms, but also the critical importance of proper credential management. Employing Multi-factor authentication is a key part of maintaining a robust cybersecurity posture and ensuring company and customer data Is only accessed by authorized parties.

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      Know Your Breach: RedDoorz

      The target: RedDoorz, a Singapore based hotel booking site.

      The take: Exposure of 5.9 million records of Personally Identifiable Information including: names, contact numbers, email addresses, dates of birth, encrypted passwords and booking information.

      The attack vector: The attacker gained access to an Amazon Web Services key which was embedded in an APK (Android Application Package), a piece of software used in their systems. Had the firm examined the APK, they could have prevented the exploit by removing the AWS key from the APK.

      This breach highlights the critical importance of IT asset management, specifically just how necessary it is that firms are aware of what software they are using and how it is being deployed. Regular auditing of all software configurations, especially where customer data is stored, across the firm is essential for maintaining a robust cybersecurity posture.

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